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Leonard Nimoy indeed lived long, and prospered

Coming home after an afternoon out, I just checked the news, and saw this. '' Leonard Nimoy, who played Mr Spock in the cult sci-fi series Star Trek, has died at the age of 83 in Los Angeles, his family has said.'' As a star trek fan, I am suddenly heartbroken: Nimoy, through Spock, helped make Star trek something I love. While I came to the franchise after the original series, I adore the films starring the original crew, which Nimoy both starred in and, in one or two, directed. Spock was one of the greatest characters, present throughout the franchise's sixty-year history, and part of me hoped we'd see him again in forthcoming films. That will not happen now, and I feel deeply upset about it. I can only send you here, to one of my all time favourite star trek scenes, and say that Mr. Nimoy has been, and always shall be, my friend.

Tesco selects girl with cp as model

I'm not sure quite what to say about it in terms of commentary, but this bit of awesomeness demands linking to. Tesco has apparently selected a young girl with quite severe CP as a model for their children's clothing range. ''Holly, who uses a wheelchair and communicates using a special computer system operated by her eyes, shone at the shoot and now features on the fashion pages of the Tesco website.'' This is a small yet monumental step towards the full inclusion of people with disabilities into society; the somewhat patronising tone of the article aside, I welcome this wholeheartedly and with relish.

Streetview - the explorers handy compromise

Yesterday I was on my way home from a meeting up at the british museum, in relation to my work at the RIX centre. It had gone very well indeed, and I got some very useful networking done. On my way back to Westminster tube station, rolling through central London I felt the urge to explore. Even after five years living here, there are still places I haven't been, roads I've never rolled down. Passing through Trafalgar square, I felt very tempted to make a detour under Marble arch and cruise up the Mall. But it was getting late, and I was due home.

However, I just did it. Using the wonderful Google Maps streetview, I was able to make the trip I was not able to yesterday. I know it's not quite the same, and you do not get any of the true city experience sitting in your office, but when it's cold, wet and dark outside yet you still feel like exploring, streetview is a very handy tool.


[Edited Yesterday at 21:06:32 - spelling]

Recent action down at The Valley

Who would have thought such naughtiness went on down the hill. I just came across this story , revealing that 'Charlton [Athletic] are investigating footage that appears to show a couple having sex on the pitch at The Valley.'' I just looked it up on youtube, and it appears true. For the record, despite living a stones throw from he ground I had nothing to do with it. Frankly I'm very amused that something like this happened so close to us; it's probably the best bit of action on that pitch for quite some time.

The controversy over Qatar

Although I'm not particularly keen on football, and although it doesn't focus on one particular city, I feel as if I want to say something about the 2022 Qatar world cup. Since 2012, my eyes have been opened to sporting events, and big events in general, as a force for good in the world; a unifying force. As such, UEFA's decision to award the right to host the tournament to Qatar, and the subsequent furore currently resulting from it, interests me.

Going with Qatar was a bold move to begin with. While the middle east is often in the news, it is a part of the world we seldom focus our eyes on for sport, competition or friendship. No city in the middle east has ever hosted he Olympics. Thus it is good to see the region being included, brought into the family, in this way. No doubt the increased attention on the region will make us more aware of it's rich history and culture, which can only be a good thing. Let the world see Doha as they saw London.

At the same time, though, I have to feel slightly cynical about all this. Given it's such a tiny country, not known for it's love of sport, one must wonder what lay behind UEFAs decision. Plenty of other countries were bidding, including the UK, who are much better placed to host such an event. I'm sure I'm not the only one who can detect a whiff of corruption in the air. Now we have the farcical dilemma over whether to hold it in the summer or winter, moreover, part of me feels that they should cut their losses an restart the selection process. After all, I'd love to see another big sporting event in Britain.

We all know, of course, that UEFA is not going to do that: for starters, Qatar, it's stadia already half built, would be up in arms. But with domestic leagues deeply discontent over yesterday's decision over timing, UEFA is frankly making itself a complete laughing stock.