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Bragadocious

It often astonishes me how quickly the people who know how can get such videos made, but this one is definitely worth linking to. It's a remix of the recent Clinton/trump debate. I didn't see the debate save for highlights, but from what I hear, clinton won hands down. I think this video captures the absurdity of it well: the consumate, professional politician verses the absolute joke whom we can still barely believe is the actual republican candidate. I suppose videos like this are a natural reaction to such insane situations - what else can one do?

White privilege and the innate biasses of the world around us.

I'd just like to flag this article up. It's by a black lady in america explaining to a white friend about ''white privilege''. She elaborates on how small, little racist incidents frequently occur but often go unrecorded and unnoticed. Barely conscious things many white people don't realise happen, such as people not really believing that she went to Princeton - the actual Princeton - because she is black. She states that people are more prone to incredulity than when a white person answers in the same way. It's a good point well made: white people don't realise how extensive and deeply rooted white privilege is. To that I would add that it's a similar story in the disability sphere. Able bodied people don't seem to notice how privileged they are; a step is just a step to them, but to us it could be a massive hurdle. The world is geared towards able bodied people just as, as the writer of the article explains, it's geared towards people with white skin (and for that matter males, straight people, gender conforming people etc etc). We should speak more about such biasses, and be more open about how the world is 'built' to accommodate certain types of people to the disadvantage of others. That is not to cast blame on certain people, but simply to expose and thus start to remedy the innate biasses of the world around us.

A great afternoon film making

Had I not just had so much coffee, I'd probably be feeling rather tired by now. It has been an awesome afternoon. We continued our group Londoners film, and I got to do some filming, a camera mounted on my wheelchair. I think I got some really cool shots, but, perhaps more importantly, I felt part of a team. We have a really good Londoners film in the making, and what makes me even more proud is that it all came about after I suggested the venue of the cafe in the park. This afternoon, I had one of those - surprisingly frequent - moments when I stood proverbially back and thought ''Wow, how did my life get this awesome?''

This all came about after L suggested I go get help to stop drinking so much, as I'm afraid to say it was getting a bit out of hand. I went to Lifeline in Woolwich, who put me on Chocolate films' 1000 Londoners project. Incredibly, it was precisely what I wanted and needed: a chance to make films and the help to do so. It is staggering how such things happen sometimes. Everything just falls in place, as if by magic. Not only have I now stopped drinking completely, but I'm involved in the making of not one but two films - the very artform and industry which, after finishing my masters, I wanted so badly to get into. Both films are well on their way to completion, and I can't wait to put links to them on here.


[Edited 27/09/2016 at 18:13:51 - added a bit]

Live music at the local thai restaraunt

Last night was rather cool. Every month or so, the Thai Restaurant around the corner runs a sort of music night. We hadn't been in ages, but the other day Lyn and I were out and about and spotted it advertised, so we decided to go check it out. I was only expecting a little affair, but last night we got there to find the small place packed with people. The music was already in full swing.

We settled down at the front to listen. After a while, though, someone recognised Lyn, remembering her from last time, and asked her to play some tracks. Unfortunately they didn't have the right jack for her Ipad, so they made do with a microphone. Lyn put two of her songs on, playing along to them with thumbjam.

It was a great evening; it feels like ages since I had one like it. It felt very social; as if everyone knew everyone else. At one point, I helped out a singer by calling up the lyrics to 'Summertime' on my ipad. There was a friendly, warm atmosphere in the room, and I'm now really looking forward to the next one.


[Edited 27/09/2016 at 19:13:27 - added a bit]

Using backspace to go back in chrome

I'm suddenly quite cheerful. A few weeks ago, I noticed I could no longer press backspace to go to the previous webpage in google chrome. It was only a small change, but I had been using that little shortcut since Steve B showed it to me way back at Macc College, fifteen years ago. Like using arrow keys to scroll firefox, it was useful; it meant I didn't have to bugger about with the mouse to go back. Their claim was that they had received complaints from people inadvertently going to previous web pages when writing text, but that whiffed of bullshit to me. I'd just reconciled myself to the fact of yet one more pointless change made by a huge company which makes my life just a tad harder, but, moaning to Lyn about it just now, she told me to look it up. I tapped it into google, and sure enough they had received so many complaints about it that they were forced to make a remedy. It is available here. I'm glad to see I'm not the only one fond of such little tricks.