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Anti-Brexit protests cannot be ignored

Thousands marched to oppose brexit yesterday, but it got hardly a mention on the news last night. I would have liked to have gone, but was busy filming (more on this soon). More and more people are waking up and realising they were deceived, lied to and manipulated into voting Leave. Brexit is not the will of the people and must - MUST - be stopped. I know the outists won the referendum, but how can this continue? How can the tories plough on with Brexit, amid ever-growing opposition and as the country descends further and further into intolerance, xenophobia and a form of fascism? The mainstream media is currently ignoring the protests, trying to turn a blind eye to the anger; but before long it will realise that this is a problem which cannot be ignored. The people of this country were swindled by liars last June; it is now essential that it is restored to the right path - outward-looking, internationalist, tolerant - before it is too late.

Spring is come

Spring is here, and summer's near,

The sky so clear, with so much cheer.

Grass so green, wind so still;

A day ahead waiting to fill.

Life's so ripe on days like these;

Like corn in a field and fruit on the trees.

Spring is come and summer near,

Winter banished with all its fear.

The calm of the river

Lyn and I took a walk down to the Thames yesterday evening, where she took this stunning image on her Ipad. I love the way Lyn captures the calm of the evening, in contrast to the hustle and bustle of the city behind.

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Amid all it's current strife, there truly is beauty in the world - you just have to look for it.


[Edited 24/03/2017 at 17:35:40 - added a bit]

Meeting Sharon and Dan in the park

Yesterday for me was quite a nice day. I did my usual volunteer work at school, then, around three, went to meet Sharon for a coffee in the park. We planned to meet there yesterday a week or so ago, but we hadn't met up in three or four weeks so it was good to see her. Dan came too, and Lyn joined us there shortly after, so for a while the little place was crammed with wheelchairs.

It was a really nice afternoon. We discussed this and that. For a while, Dan and Sharon were discussing all the ins and outs of running a powerchair football club, and it was quite fascinating to hear them talk about the politics involved. That sport is far more serious and complex than I thought: for me, it is just something fun to do on Saturdays, but from the way my friends were talking yesterday afternoon, I glimpsed a far more severe, competitive and even cut-throat side to it.

We had got there about three, but in winter, before the clocks go forward, the cafe closes about four, so our gathering ended all too soon. Sharon made her way off, agreeing to see us again next week. Dan's train home, however, wasn't until about five, so we all came back here to continue chatting. Dan is a very nice guy: it amuses us both that we went to the same special school in Cheshire, and ended up meeting again down here. We discussed Hebden a bit yesterday, swapping opinions of old teachers.

Then dan looked at his phone, probably just to check the time, and said that something was happening up in Westminster. I came here, into my office, to look at my computer, and saw the news. It would seem that yesterday wasn't such a good day after all. I felt the usual sense of bewilderment and concern one usually feels when you see news like that: you can't do anything about it; information is sparse, so all you can really do is sit back and wait for news to trickle in. The news was showing streets I now know quite well, full of police, emergency vehicles and frightened, bewildered people. On the whole, though, I'm just relieved that it wasn't far, far worse.

Shortly after that, Dan set off back to his place. He was worried about how this incident would effect public transport, but I checked a few hours later that he had got home safely. This is the sort of thing one has to expect when you live in a city like london. This isn't rural cheshire. As vast and dynamic as london is, the metropolis also has it's dark side.


[Edited 23/03/2017 at 11:26:01 - spelling]

Rather busy

Things have suddenly got rather busy. As of yesterday, I have a presentation to prepare, a film to shoot and an exhibition to organise, as well as a few other, smaller projects I'm working on. I'm beginning to feel a bit swamped. The problem is, I keep making all these suggestions, telling people I can do all these things, and I don't notice the work piling up. At the same time, I feel more confident than ever. I know I can do it, and that when it is done, it will be awesome. It's just a case of knuckling down and getting on with it, so on that note, I better get back to work.