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Changing Discourses

I have been watching quite a lot of Youtube recently; it has become one of the websites I go to most, and I can spend hours on it watching videos. I'm sure we all do these days. I was just thinking, though: Is YouTube to film what twitter is to the novel? Short, intense forms of writing are encouraged online; is this similar to the short film form we see on YouTube? Do the shortened forms of both languages share qualities, i.e. Directness and immediacy? Short videos online are becoming far more analytical these days: people are increasingly using YouTube to say things they formerly used writing to, such as film analysis or political commentary. At the same time, as on twitter, these videos are a short, rather abrupt form of discourse - most videos I watch are only ten to fifteen minutes. Broadly speaking, they use the conventional grammar of other video media, but, just like on Twitter, it is highly abbreviated in order to deliver the maximum amount of information in the minimum time.

Thus, online, discourse is becoming shorter as a whole, yet no less informed. Intellectual expression - how we communicate our ideas and thoughts - seems to be changing, adapting to the online world. It is adapting to the shorter attention spans we now seem to have, as well as becoming more democratic inasmuch as we all have the ability to get our views across. This new online video language is one anyone with a cameraphone can use. Yet it is becoming no less deep and engaged: in fact, going by the videos I've been watching recently, people are far more intellectually engaged and curious than when they only had writing to express their ideas. Perhaps this is because new forms of media in a way encourage people to experiment. Either way the online world is opening up new languages and ways to express ourselves; visual, image-based forms of communication, more easily understood than the rarified neoacademic forms of writing used up until now.


[Edited 23/09/2017 at 16:11:14 - addad a bit]

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